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The student is thus enabled to verify his pronunciation, not only of the Eng Hsh words, but also of those adopted from foreign languages. (New York: Col- umbia University Press, 1916.) Bartlett's Concordance. xviii Introductory with the result that this book will be found to conflict in some instances with the dictionaries themselves. Some phoneticians give e as an equivalent for this sound. This sound is Explanation of Key to Pronunciation liii exceedingly difficult for an English-speaking adult to produce. See = the name referred to is identical with the one in question; or that there is, in addition, another reference to this name, which other reference will be found under the name referred to. = interesting additional information will be found under the name to be com- pared. In cases where the rhythm disproves the current modern pronunciation of a name, as in Vaughan, the familiar, modern pronunciation is given first, with a later comment, such as, "frequently a dissyllable." 13.

A New and Complete Concordance or Verbal Ifidex to Words, Phrases, and Passages in the Dramatic Works of Shakespeare with a Supplementary Co7icordance to the Poems, by John Bartlett, A. As previously stated, there are many Shakespearean names whose pronunciation is not indicated in any au- thentic compilation, else this book would not have been attempted. The lips are pursed as for the sound of ii, but the aperture is not so small. It may be approximated by puckering the lips to a whistle, but saying e with the tongue. The Unes quoted from the plays are taken from the Everyman's Shakespeare, and the number of the line from the Globe Shakespeare, on which Bart- lett's Concordance is based. ti in griin chorus French Nasal N ks lacks, lax a N, as in encore kw = qu quick, queen a N, " "vin ng song d N, " "bonbon s see, place li N, " " un Iviii ALPHABETICAL INDEX OF NAMES PRONOUNCED A Aaron (ar'-% or 3,'-r**n).

In addition other lines are occasionally quoted in corroboration of pronunciation. Besides the alphabetical list of names in the dictionary proper, the book presents separately the complete Dramatis Persons of each play, so that by turning over the 47 pages at the back of the book, one may rapidly compare the separate lists of characters, instead of turning to thirty-seven different plays in possibly as many volumes. (New York: Robert Appleton Co., 1907-1914.) Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia — Vol. (New York: The Century Co., 1911.) viii Bibliography Clarke's Concordance. (London: Smith, Elder & Co., begun in 1885.) Dictionnaire de la Langue Frangaise, par £. (Paris: Librairie Hachette et Cie., 1873.) Dyce, Rev. A Glossary to the Works of William Shakespeare, revised by Harold Littledale. Words were given us to communicate our ideas by; and there must be something unconceivably absurd in uttering them in such a manner that either people cannot understand them, or will not desire to understand them." Whatever may be said of the beauty of our language, we cannot pretend that it is consistent; it were futile to at- tempt to pour all names into one mold, and pronounce them in accordance with definite rules; that would be like rhyming cough with bough, and tough with dough — they look alike, but they defy consistency and are the despair of foreigners. This sound closely resembles the long double o (oo), but the Hps are more firmly closed and more rounded for w than for oo. Such words as menu, Goethe, encore, chauffeur, bon voyage, are encountered daily in conversation and in books. Acting characters are listed by the name under which they appear in the Dramatis Personc B. In such cases only one entry of the name or title is made with the direction "See the specific names." 4. The customary in- formation concerning characters in the Dramatis Personc B will be found in the last section of this book. When the same name occurs outside of the play in which a character of that name has an acting part, the name is entered in light-faced type, and a definition or explanation added: e. Abel (a'-b^'l), in biblical history, a son of Adam and Eve.

In those pages the Dramas are arranged alphabetically. (New York: The Cassell Publishing Co., 1894.) Brewer, Rev. Proper names in any language, do not, of course, follow absolutely the rules that govern the pronunciation of ordinary words; they are a law unto themselves, following only certain fundamental charac- teristics. In the production of this sound, the vocal cords are set in vibration. The pronunciations of the French words le, de, la are peculiarly difi&cult to indicate diacritically. All characters that take part in any way in the plays will be found entered in black-faced type: e. The names of persons, places, mytho- logical characters, etc., mentioned within the text, are in light-faced type: e. Any odd variations or appellations are mentioned under this name, and are again recorded in light-faced type in their proper alphabetical order. When there is more than one character bearing the same name or more than one definition for a given word, differentiation between them will be found under the name: e. g., Ceres is found as Ceres and immediately following as Ceres. Cross references are given in exactly the form of the name referred to: e. In its proper alphabetical place, merely as a cross reference to the modern spelling.

HAYDEN & ELDREDGE Class _r:_t C3-0-S Book 'XTCpg COEa? ^©BQver a play by Shakespeare is produced die- ouesions arise as to the correct pronunciation of thei names of the characters. CHURCHILL AND WITH A LIST OF THE DRAMAS ARRANGED ALPHABETICALLY INDICATING THE PRONUNCLA. (Lon- don: Macmillan & Co., 1911.) Harper's Latin Dictionary, edited by Lewis and Short, (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1879.) Bibliography ix Henry Irving Shakespeare. (Stratford-on- Avon: Shakespeare Press, 1911.) Lee, Sir Sidney. (New York: The Macmillan Co., 1916.) See also Dictionary of Na- tional Biography. Lippincott Co., 1913.) Lippincott's Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography and Mythology, by Joseph Thomas. No one had ever compiled a complete list of the proper names in Shakespeare, with their pronunciations.

So far as I am .aware there le no book which provides final information on this (Subject. X ^ ^^^y^^-^ HOW TO PRONOUNCE THE NAMES IN SHAKESPEARE THE PRONUNa ATION OF THE NAMES IN THE DRAMATIS PERSONAE OF EACH OF SHAKESPEARE' S PLAYS, ALSO THE PRONUNCIATION AND EXPLANATION OF PLACE NAMES AND THE NAMES OF ALL PERSONS, MYTHOLOGICAL CHARACTERS, ETC., FOUND IN THE TEXT WITH FOREWORDS BY E. TION OF THE NAMES OF THE CHARACTERS IN THE PLAYS BY THEODORA URSULA IRVINE ■I DRAMATIC READER AND TEACHER OF DICTION CAKNEGIE HALL, NEW YORK CITY HINDS, HAYDEN & ELDREDGE, Inc. ft\ Copjnight, 1919, by Hinds, Hayden & Eldredge, Inc. A5I240 7 TO ^ ALL WHO WOULD HONOR THE SHAKESPEARE I THEY LOVE, BY PRONOUNCING CORRECTLY THE NAMES HE HAS IMMORTALIZED Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue: Hamlet, Act III, Scene 2, lines 1-2. The Works of William Shake- speare, by Henry Irving and Frank A. (Lon- don: Blackie & Son, 1888-1890.) Hudson or Harvard Edition. (Boston: Ginn, Heath & Co., 1883.) Imperial Dictionary of the English Language, by John Ogilvie, revised by Charles Annandale. Lippincott's New Pronouncing Gazetteer of the World, edited by Angelo Heilprin and Louis Heilprin. Instead of avoiding trouble I had unwittingly plunged into it.

Separate sections are devoted to discussion of the pronunciation, respectively, of the Greek and Latin names, the Ita Uan, the French, and the English names. Under separate heads are brief discussions of Rhythm as Affecting Pronunciation, Anglicizing Foreign Nantes, Folios and Quartos, etc. A carefully prepared Key to Pronunciation is a very important feature. (London: Macmillan & Co, 1874.) Ayres, Harry Morgan. As to names from foreign languages I have preferred to take the sounds from the lips of persons native to the language, rather than to trust solely to dictionaries. Theodor Siebs says that at the end of a syllable or before a consonant, g is spoken like ich, as ewig, freudig, K'onig, Hotiig. The nearest approximate sound is made by producing the short sound of a (a) as in at, and thinking ang without actually saying it. Reference is made to the plural form of a word if it occurs when the reference is not "etc." (See explanation of etc. Adjectives are included in the Alphabetical Index Ivi Introductory when the root form of the word does not occur in the form of a noun; otherwise adjectives are omitted: e. = the name occurs in more than two scenes in Shakespeare whether in only one play or in various plays. Abbey (ab'-i), meaning the famous Westminster Abbey in London.

The necessary detailed explana- tion of this Key is provided on page x Uv. The Question of Shakspere's Pronun- ciation, in Shaksperian Studies, edited by Brander Mat- thews and Ashley Horace Thorndike. Genealogical Tables of the Sovereigns of the World. The dictionary pronimciation has been carefully compared with that of educated Italians, Frenchmen, Englishmen, and others. An exception is made when -lich follows -ig, as koniglich pro- nounced as if koniklich. o, as in French jeu (zho), or German Goethe, schon. The nearest approximate sound is made by producing the long Italian a (a) as in arm, and thinking ang without actually saying it. g., Turkish is omitted because Turk and Turkey appear; but Assyrian is entered because neither the word Assyria nor any other noun-form of the word occurs in Shakespeare. passim = the name occurs in more than two lines in the one scene noted.

I must be paid for my reading as I go along by the pleasure it gives me, line for line. I ^ Alphabetical Pronouncing Index Abraham, the founder of the Hebrew race, changed from Abram by divine command.

g., the Duke of Somerset in 2 Henry VI is not the same individual as the Duke of Somerset in 3 Henry VI, although the same name, Edward Beaufort, is borne by each; such points as these are clearly set forth in the Alphabetical Index. It quotes (in this Alphabetical Index) the preferences in prommciation of such scholars as Dr. The Age of Fable, or Beauties of Mythology, revised by the Rev. A General and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the United Kingdom, by John Burke. He says: "What is the constant and just observation as to all actors upon the stage? (3) r, as in car, father, farm, by some called the silent r.

Horace Howard Fumess, Jr., and Professor Brander Mat- thews, and of all the prominent Shakespearean actors of the day. (London: Henry Colburn, 1826, and later editions.) Cambridge Shakespeare. Is it not, that those who have the best sense always speak the best, though they may happen not to have the best voices? This r is relatively obscure compared with the two varieties of tr Uled r. For final er this book uses the more familiar transcription er. or, The final syllable -or is usually pronounced er, but many actors and public speakers prefer the sound of or, sometimes or, as Windsor, Nestor, etc., particularly when the word occurs in an heroic passage where the fuller soimd of the vowel is needed to carry the tone. b, d, f, h, 1, m, n, p, t, v, z have their familiar values.

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